First day of SAT summer school at TestMagic (2007)

Today was the first day of our summer school at TestMagic. As is always the case, I’ve been pretty nervous for the past few weeks while enrolling students, coordinating schedules for our teachers, and deciding on the best materials to use with our new students. And as always, today once I was in the classroom teaching, interacting with students, it was the same reaction–yes, these are young, fresh minds who are eager to learn, and I can teach them a lot. We’ve got a great program planned out for our students this year. While we’ve always done a lot of free, informal workshops and one-to-one assistance, this year we have a bunch of workshops planned for our students, including workshops to help students with the personal statements, college admissions in general, and a few other things.

I was very happy with the students that I met today. One class consisted entirely of Lowell students. Not a single student from another school. We have more Lowell students at TestMagic than we do students from any other school, so I am very familiar with the Lowell students. In general they tend to be bright, but often a bit tired because they’re loaded with so much work. But my students today were very promising, and for the most part, hard-working.

I always like to make a lot of jokes during class (to be honest, I get bored if I don’t make the class interesting), and this group was pretty fun to work with. We got a lot done, which to me is ultimately the most important thing.

“Revolutionary”

As good a topic as any to kick off this blog, I suppose. 🙂

“Our revolutionary approach to test prep can help your test scores soar. Guaranteed.”

Don’t get me wrong, I understand the temptation–you think your approach to teaching the test is the best (otherwise you wouldn’t be teaching that way) and you have at least a few students who tell you that they think your way of teaching is the best. And probably a few of those students will tell you that they’ve studied at other places before and didn’t like it.

A good friend of mine and I for many years have had a running joke about how many people you need to agree with you for you to think that your belief is incontrovertible. Yes, we believe that for many people (including us in many cases) that that number is surprisingly low–two, to be exact. Continue reading